Posts tagged with "moraira property news"

Spainish Property Update Nov 2013

Statistics released by the Central Government Public Works on property purchase during the second quarter indicate a resurgence of interest in buying property in Spain. Figures demonstrated an increase in sales in five of Spain’s 18 autonomous regions. The province of Alicante saw a total of 3,543 properties purchased making it the most popular province.

Interestingly, 54% of buyers in the province of Alicante came from abroad compared to a national average of 17% across Spain. The British are the principal buyers, mainly retirees, followed by Belgian, French and Russian purchasers. Furthermore, according to figures from the National Council of Notaries up to June 2013, 70% of the homes purchased in Spain were paid for without mortgages, whereas, prior to the economic crisis only 37% of Spanish homes were bought with no loan. One reason for this adjustment can be attributed to the lower prices of property since the economic crisis. Indeed, a study conducted by the Pompeu Fabra University revealed some areas of Spain have seen price reductions of up to 50%. These price corrections have stimulated investors to consider property as a viable option when planning their financial future. You will see that this graph clearly indicates what has been happening since the property crisis in Spain. Spanish Property Sales graph 2006-2012

There has been a change in the financial tide and as the banks lose both trust and credibility, investors are beginning to modify their attitude and behavior towards their investments. In addition, the precarious state of stocks and shares has left investors facing the challenge to find the foundation for a more resilient investment. Furthermore, the ridiculously low interest rates currently offered to savers leaves no doubt that a more constructive approach to investment is required. In short, the lost rapport, damaged trust and jaded attitude towards traditional avenues of saving and investing has resulted in a revolution as individuals search for a healthier return on their money.

The emerging savvy investor is recognising the value of a tangible investment. For example, in Moraira and Javea you can purchase a stunning 5-6 bedroom villa in a prime rental location for around 483,000 to 647,000 euros including the 12.5% purchase cost. The historical income of a property of this nature is around 40,000-50,000 euros gross, per annum. Or perhaps you could consider a property with four bedrooms offering an income of 25,000-30,000 euros annually for a purchase price of circa 400,000 euros.

The highly desirable areas of Moraira and Javea offer unspoilt resorts with beautiful coastline backed by spectacular mountain ranges. The wealth of charm and tradition is maintained by strict conservation rules ensuring the area remains unblemished. Attracted by the sun-soaked, fun-filled promises of the Northern Costa Blanca area visitors are also treated to surprisingly stunning countryside with dramatic landscapes, green vineyards, almond groves and orange orchards. A short drive from the coastal towns leads you to between craggy mountains dotted with traditional white-washed villages. Follow the narrow mountain passes and head high to be rewarded with breath-taking views. As you ascend you may be lucky enough to discover, nestling on the mountain side, traditional family run restaurants offering simple delicious food and wine menus to satisfy the hungry traveller. These unique experiences along with one of the best climates in the world offering 300 days of sunshine each year ensure visitors repeatedly return to the unspoilt area of North Costa Blanca.

In order to maintain a healthy return on your investment you will need to consider how to manage the property. Some owners choose to hire a property management company who offer a complete package acting as the lynchpin between property owners and rental guests. They take responsibility for advertising, bookings, maintenance, cleaning and pool care. A reputable company will offer good service resulting in repeat bookings. A letting agent of this nature typically charge 30-40% for their service. On a property costing 438,000 as mentioned above, this offers you an income of around 24,000-28,000 euros, a return on investment of 5-6%. Alternatively, you could maximise your return on investment, increasing it to 7-8% by choosing to orchestrate bookings and advertising yourself. There are many small businesses in the area that you could arrange to take care of the changeover and pool care.

The chances of capital growth in the highly desirable Javea and Moraira area is very realistic. Prices have now stabilised and inflation alone will guarantee growth in your investment. Furthermore, vendors are pricing their properties realistically and are willing to negotiate. Javea, Moraira and the Bennisa Coast have sustained reasonable property sales throughout the crisis. The outlook is positive for this beautiful area of the Northern Costa Blanca.

If you are considering a purchase there are a number of elements to consider. For example, a north facing villa may rent well but if in the future you wish to sell it, you risk excluding Northern European buyers as they crave sunshine all year round. Engaging the services of a professional property investment advisor will ensure all gems of information are brought to light. By covering the complete market of properties available they will be able offer you the much needed insight and reveal the excellent opportunities available.

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Posted by on 11/16/2013 18:51:00

Moraira Property News 2012

Property sales in the Alicante province rose by 10% in
August compared to the same period in 2011. The rise is attributed to the increase in the number of
foreign buyers.

On a national scale the buying level has also risen according
to this report and others.

Although we can not obtain figures from the notary by town,
our local experience of the Moraira & Javea property market provides a good
barometer and supports the statistics. If anything, we would say that Moraira
has seen a significant rise in property sales during 2012 compared to 2011 according to
many estate agents and independent sources. It makes you wonder what the proportion of the Moraira property sales were, relative to the increase of the regional figures announced. Such a shame the notaries
will not provide us with the breakdowns per town. We have tried but our efforts were in vain. Apparently, all figures get sent
to the regional governments statistical department, where they collate the info
by region, or so we were told. We would have thought that this information should be public
knowledge! If anyone would like to take this up and let us know, we would
really appreciate it. We think it would provide some very useful information,
especially for prospective purchasers.

Purchasers are still mostly cash buyers but there are still a few that require mortgages. The problem with mortgages recently is that the valuations are poor.

The banks simply do not want any
risk. Some of the figures they give are very hard to swallow and in no way reflect the
actual prices being achieved on the ground. A word of advice here, especially
if you want to ensure the bank can give a prospective purchaser a better
valuation, is to make sure you have any undeclared accommodation registered
before you agree to a valuation or, if possible, even offer the property for sale.

The banks can only value what is registered!  It’s going to cost you to register what has not been registered already on
completion, so you might as well get it done first and at least you will
give yourself a better sales opportunity. Yes it’s outlay now rather than later
but money well spent! It could be the difference between a sale or no sale.

There seems to be many properties with un-registered
under-builds and extensions that can not be included in the banks valuation. As
an example a villa that’s priced at 550k may only value up to 315k should the
downstairs or extension not be registered with the land registry. This value is
what the bank will base their lending upon. 60-70% mortgages can still be
obtained, so it’s prudent to be ahead of the game if you are a vendor.

If you are a purchaser willing to pay the valuation fees,
circa 400 euros, for a bank valuation, it might be a good idea to ask the
vendor or estate agent if everything has been registered before you give the
instruction to the bank requesting a valuation, otherwise you may be in for a shock when the banks give you the
figures! So before you build up any hopes, please be aware of these facts.  If it has been valued and the figures are poor for the reason mentioned, the
vendor may of course try to get it all registered to satisfy a higher
valuation, which usually takes 2-3 weeks but in the meantime you may
run the risk of someone else buying the property and then you are 400 euros worse off and
dreams shattered. So it pays to do your home work and ask the right questions.

If you require sound property investment advice, please
contact us to find out more

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Posted by on 10/15/2012 20:00:00

Moraira Property Update

It’s been a while since we wrote about the Moraira property scene as we wanted to see and experience where it was heading.

As far as the property market goes it has picked up significantly for most if compared to the previous two years. The market seems to have stabilised albeit there are still many properties that are over priced. That said price corrections are now common place, but still the best bargains tend to be down to the personal circumstances of the vendor.

The year so far for us has been fantastic and likewise for many agents we speak to with property sales on the increase. Thanks to Moraira being a highly desirable place to be it attracts property sales as soon as things start to stabalise. There are many buyers around at the moment and hope this trend continues regardless of the UK media always talking about Spain’s deficit and painting a doom and gloom picture. The negativity probably takes the heat off the UK’s recent austerity measures.

Spain has its problems and they are of course very serious as is the UK’s but the coastal town of Moraira remains far more insulated from the wrath of the poor economic climate as a whole. In fact this summer has seen some of the largest crowds at the local fiestas ever and villa rentals are almost full.

The market here in Moraira is driven by Northern Europeans more so than the nationals or Spanish economics, although it’s bound to have some bearing on things especially when taxes or rates increase. Regardless of increasing living cost here in Spain, northern Europeans still want sunshine and a little paradise for their families. The irony is that people are now getting used to the economic problems and know they will not be going away for some time but meantime they still have a life to get on with regardless and now seems to be a good time to invest in property rather than leave cash in the bank which is also a concern for many.

The threat of turmoil was worse than actually being in it as we are today.
The problem with a threat is that you don’t really know how bad is it going to be, so people fear the worse and sit tight becoming spectators for a while which makes things even worse and then they wait until it’s bottomed out. The talk of a double dip recession does not make much sense unless you believe in a so called recovery. We all know the economic struggles we have today will last for years, it’s hardly going to recover and will simply stabalise itself and remain tough. We will probably see some more bailouts, mergers and austerity measures over the next two years or so but for most it will be no surprise and life will continue and wealth will still be created and spent.

So when does it bottom out? If bank bailouts, country bailouts, hardly any interest being paid from the banks to savers, debasement of their currency through the printing of even more money, lowest interest rates in history as well as the real cost of inflation being hidden is not enough, I don’t know what is!
Its no wonder property is becoming a safe haven again.

Consequently we see so many property buyers coming from Holland, Belgium and the UK. Only this time around it is being led by people that understand value for money and investment opportunities plus they are mostly cash buyers. Very different from the boom days where the many could well afford the Spanish dream based upon their equity in their main residence and when banks fell over backwards to lend money which all added to the property price hike.

Having spoken with many clients over the months it’s obvious there has been a shift in the mind set where once people were more than willing to sit it out and leave their money in the bank or in other investments.
95% of all our clients are now cash buyers. This is because anyone with savings, especially in a bank, hardly earns any interest. They seem to be taking their money and investing it into something tangible. Most do not gamble with stocks and shares at this level and historically property has always been a good long term investment that is reasonably safe, plus it is income bearing if you go down the letting route and you get to use it with the family, so it kind of makes sense.

Spanish banks have begun to lend again but to get the best deals around you need to put down 40%. The less risk for the bank the better the deal for you!
They do lend up to 70% and sometimes a little more but the packages are not as good.
They also vet you like never before especially if you have your own business, so be prepared! We have a few contacts for mortgages if needed!

A word of advice: It’s better to get your finances in order before looking for a property because you may be refused by the bank or if not by the time you get mortgage approval the property you found to be a real bargain gets sold to someone else. Happens all the time! If it’s any good that is.

Happy property hunting and don’t forget we can take away the stress and find properties others can’t as well as make things very easy for you!

Good luck until next time

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Posted by on 07/27/2010 07:25:00

Javea Property For Sale update

Sketch of Javea Montgo Villa for Sale

Sketch of Javea Montgo Villa for Sale

The Euro zone nations have recently been leading the way as far as Javea property for sale and Moraira property for sale is concerned. Buyers from the UK still think that property for sale in Javea or property for sale in Moraira is overpriced even though there has been a significant price reduction.

The recent fall, yet again, in sterling means the UK buyers are no better off regardless of a 20 –30% price drop on average. The UK media coverage says that the prices have fallen sharply in Spain and you can pick up villas at a fraction of the original cost.

This generalization is not true of the Javea and Moraira property market. In all fairness the prices have held up very well. I think a lot of this is more to do with the fact that Moraira and Javea are very well established areas full of villas of a more bespoke nature for the more discerning client. Yes there has been a property boom here too but it has not been built up in the same way as the massive purpose built housing estates to the south of Alicante, created at a price to sell to the masses.

This is where we see massive problems and consequently massive price reductions. Unfortunately the media rarely make any distinction between the prosperous areas and the not so prosperous areas. Remember bad news sells papers!

There are various articles about Moraira and Javea that may go some way to explain why these areas are so highly desired. If you are thinking about investing in a holiday home it is well worth while to do as much research as you possibly can and hopefully this website will aid you in some way. If you prefer to speak with one of us directly please feel free to do so, we don’t bite! Or you may want to view some properties for sale in javea or properties for sale in Moraira

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Posted by on 10/04/2009 16:40:00

Property valuations in Javea & Moraira

3 bed 120m2 moraira apartment for sale

3 bed 120m2 moraira apartment for sale

Recently I have been trying to make sense of property prices and valuations in Moraira and Javea.

There seems to be all sorts of data around with regard to valuations. The majority is not area specific relative to the Javea and Moraira properties for sale. Although we have seen, in some cases, a price reduction of around 20 – 30 % in advertised sales prices, it does not represent a true picture of the underlying value that was born during 2007 – 2009 financial crisis.

What the majority can afford will always dictate the underlying value of a property. It just takes a while for the reality to kick in. Many property owners out there simply don’t have to sell or can hang on to an unrealistic price until such a time when the majority of prices have been corrected. They then have to follow suit if they wish to sell. This process usually takes three years to bottom out to a realistic level. Some properties are priced to sell but the majority for sale still doesn’t reflect reality.

The properties that seem to sell are being substantially reduced when it comes to the actual deal done. Most never get to know how low the actual sales price was relative to the asking price. Many offers are refused but the ones that are selling are deals based upon a more realistic price level to start with. So how do you get a realistic valuation?

The process of valuation is arrived at by various means but rest assured, it’s always way behind the market when it comes to the reality of reductions! Most vendors already seem to know how much their villa is worth. They arrive at this in the usual way and this is based upon other advertised prices and what they think properties have been sold at next door or down the road over the past few months. Then by making adjustments for what they paid for their property and how much money they have spent on it, plus adding some on to negotiate with and “oh, the exchange rate is not in my favour” etc.

The other way is to ask an estate agent to come around to value the property. Estate agents are aware of the market conditions and will use slightly revised figures per square meter that reflect this but will still hold out in hope that the market will improve or will not be as affected like other areas. Historically there is a lot of truth in this as far as Javea and Moraira go. These desirable areas have been able to ride the storm far more than other areas, but of late there seem to be many people having no alternative other than to sell at low prices. In my opinion this time next year will see the low priced deals done today being the advertised sales price next year. So the initial figures estate agents arrive at will be similar to what the banks come up with to lend new money.The only difference is that estate agents are more at liberty to be a little bit more creative with the rest, usually increasing the valuation to please the vendor subject to how desperate they are to sell.

The truth is there is no rock solid formula and the formulas that exist in my opinion, do not reflect the true underlying value of a property or basically what the majority can now afford. Even the official figures are lagging behind what’s happening on the ground and what’s actually happening on the ground is lagging behind the financial crisis born during 2007 and it’s not over. It may take another year before we see some realistic prices being advertised, maybe even longer.

Estate agents talk amongst themselves and know, even if they are not selling much them selves, some of the properties being sold and at what price some are exchanging hands for. Many can’t believe the deals that are being done and it would insult many vendors out there wishing to sell if they knew. Consequently it’s easier to live in the past and avoid the confrontation when asked to put a value on a property! They allow the market to take its natural course.

Another way, though at cost, to value your property is to pay a bank to do it and allow them to be as clinical as possible. Don’t sell it to them! After all these guys will probably be financing the 70% mortgage to someone, somewhere down the line. Its inevitable banks will have their say because most buyers require some form of funding or at the very least an official valuation, so you might as well know how banks are going to look upon the value of your property before hand. At least you can waive an official bank valuation in front of them regardless.

Recently I thought I would compile 200 villa properties in Javea, taken at random from various websites. I made sure that the prices were reduced prices and that the properties had a similar build 150 – 175 and plot size of 850 – 1200. Then I totaled up the build size and divided it by 200, likewise with the advertised prices. Then I divided the average price by the average build and came to an average figure of 2,300 euros per M2.
I compared this 2,300 M2 figure with some recent bank valuations and arrived at a figure that was almost the same. Today I have spoken to a property valuation expert that does valuations for the banks. Banks use various registered organizations that specialize in such activities whom follow the guidelines laid out by central government.

One such organization is Tinsa and a report by them echoes my sentiment on this subject matter even though there info is dated relative to what’s happening on the ground.

Tinsa, a Spanish property valuation company used by several high street banks, has signaled that advertised house prices will drop a further 20% over 2009. In the same report, they have calculated the drop in 2008 as being 10.1%
If this figure is correct, Tinsa say that this will bring house prices back to their advertised levels in 2005. The monthly drop may be between 1 and 1.4%.
This is not news to many agents down here on the ground, who have seen price reductions of between 20 – 40% in the resale market. The official figures often lag behind the reality of business day to day.
A 10% drop in price does not really attract attention among the bargain hunters looking to purchase a Spanish home at a drastically reduced price. It is only those properties that have reduced to 2005 prices that are actually selling.

It may well take time for certain vendors and developers to catch up with the pricing downturn. It is only those that need to sell for personal or financial reasons that are pricing their properties realistically or accepting very low offers.

This translates into only a small percentage of properties available at ‘distressed’ prices. However, they are the only properties that are selling and selling quickly.

As there seems to be no accurate formula for property valuations, I asked how they establish a value on a given property. It was a little vague but here we go…..

Firstly, they have a valuation guide by province and this is broken down to some degree by area. The problem is that there are huge fluctuations from province to province and town to town. The system depends greatly upon each individual valuation officer having knowledge of a given area and the prices these areas are able to attract. For example a like for like property in the south of Alicante would be significantly less in price than say the north of Alicante in areas like Moraira and Javea.

The bulk of the valuation is based on the amount of actual living accommodation, excluding garages, terraces and undeveloped under builds. The plot is usually included in the price/calculation, unless it’s a double plot. The pool also tends to be included. Then adjustments are taken into account relative to the overall condition of the building, gardens, views and area. So it’s part science part art. One thing for certain is that properties with greater living accommodation have always valued up very well, where as smaller accommodation will not calculate favorably and therefore will be more difficult to sell especially if the buyer requires finance.

Some of the recent bargains I have come across are larger properties of 280 and 290 M2 build. As far as bank valuations go, they value up well and one was recently valued at 670k two months ago. But the prices they are being sold at are way below a bank valuation. The figures work out at 1,300 – 1,400 per M2!!
The reason for this is because that market for older properties that were once worth 600 – 750k has virtually gone, and what’s left of that market sector can buy something that was once worth 1.2million!

So to get back to property values in a real world, many of the once 600k – 750k properties are selling at around the 400k mark, some above and some below. This is mainly due to the fact that lending has become difficult and people have less value in their currency. Spain used to be cheap!

It all sounds like doom and gloom, but let’s not hide away from what is actually happening here on the ground. You might as well know because if you have a villa that you need to sell and it’s not too dissimilar to the many out there and amongst hundreds of others for sale within a given price band that 90% of the market can not even afford, through no fault of their own, how are you going to sell your villa?

If 90% of all buyers can only raise 300k – 400k at best, plus the additional 10% cost and you happen to have a villa that you think is worth 700k or 800k, think again!
Where is your market? Who are you selling to? The few buyers around with this higher budget can find amazing villa bargains that seem unreal and unfair but they indeed exist.
If one day the advertised prices are within the grasp of the many and sterling recovers to 1.45 against the euro, you may stand a better chance of finding a buyer. Either way, you will lose out on both the reduction in price and probably on the exchange rate if you need sterling!

One thing for certain is that resale properties represent amazing value for money. And are far less expensive than new build. You would be lucky to find a decent plot for less than 225k and anything with a sea view is at least 350k for a 1000M2 plot. With the cost of architects, building permissions and modern day materials and labour you don’t get much change out of 600k and that’s for something basic. Consequently, the future of new build looks grim and only prime and very expensive plot locations seem to be being built on for a more discerning customer.

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Posted by on 07/28/2009 19:26:00

moraira property for sale

Moraira El Portet villa for sale

Moraira El Portet villa for sale

Property for sale in Moraira and property for sale in Javea is still proving to be very resilient to the huge price reductions seen elsewhere, predominantly in the mass developed areas where we have seen dramatic price reductions.
Having seen the thousands of properties on the many housing estates in these areas, it’s no wonder!

For those British property owners in Moraira and Javea that have to sell, we have seen on average a reduction of up to 30% in sales prices to reflect the devaluation of sterling. But that’s it apart from a hand full of very distressed property sales. The market is ticking along with lots of lookers but not so many buyers unless a real bargain comes up. Still there are properties being sold and recently have seen an upward trend in activity. I think significant recovery will be a long time coming but recover it will if history is anything to go by.
As to what level and when is anyone’s guess Comments appreciated.

Sterling has recently made some significant increases against the euro and British sellers are now not wishing to negotiate as much as they once were. In fact some sellers have actually increased the sales price to reflect the stronger pound. The reduction was literally based on the poor purchasing power of the pound against the euro in the first place. But even with the 30% price reduction the British are only where they were two years ago when sterling was at 1.45 So nothing has really changed! That’s why we have lost such a significant amount of British buyers and the ones that exist, some 15% of what we once had, are looking for real bargains.

All things considered, I personally think price increases at this stage are rather short sighted, as the majority of recent sales have been led by the euro zone countries taking full advantage of the price corrections fuelled by the devaluation of sterling. If British owners are unwilling to negotiate or in some recent cases, increase their prices simply because of the recovery in sterling, they risk losing not only the few British buyers around but also the many buyers from the euro zone countries.
If you are trying to sell your property in this market, one has to assume that the majority of you are pretty desperate to sell because now is not the time to do it. Buyers know this and will put in, what may seem to you as, ridiculous offers. If you do not wish to be insulted by low offers, it might be worth your while considering the possibility of removing your property from the market thus saving everyone’s time.

Lets face it, low prices and easy lending created the property boom here in Spain and consequently prices escalated. Today, easy lending has gone and so too have the second homes and inflated prices with it.
The big gains you thought you had are simply not there. If you bought midway or at the end of the property boom, you would do well to recover what you invested in the first place. Many are doing just that to make a sale. Needs must!

It’s affected us all. I am one as well and we all have to face it whether we are selling or not. The majority of house prices have fallen by at least 30% and for those that have to sell the prices need to reflect what the majority of buyers can afford. Scary stuff but the market always dictates and there are always winners and losers.

The days of easy lending, over valuations and 80- 100% mortgages etc.. are no more. Today, Spanish mortgages can be very difficult to obtain, then it’s only 50 to 60% of the price paid and then subject to much scrutiny, excellent proof of income and job security. Most used to re mortgage their main residence in their native county to afford a second home here in Spain and simply come out as cash buyers. Those were the day’s!
Property prices in Spain have risen over the years to such an extent that it has become virtually impossible for people to raise enough finance, based upon the inflated equity in their main residence as they once did.
Their house prices have fallen in value and with it have gone the easy to obtain second mortgages.
So, how then are people, other than investors with liquidity, going to be able to finance a property purchase?

Unless buyers have sold their main residence and achieved a good sales price, which is highly unlikely, then paid off their mortgage and have enough surplus to buy a Spanish home, mortgaged or not, plus leave some money in the bank for a little capital; I think it’s going to be difficult to make a sale unless you drop lucky.

How many people do you know with say 350 – 500k cash in the bank? Personally, I think you could be waiting a very long time before your property sells unless you negotiate really hard. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush!

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Posted by on 07/02/2009 18:25:00